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6 Native Delicacies You Can Find in Bacolod City Public Markets

Can you guess the delicacies that made it to the list?

By: Yoorekka Team | May 24, 2018

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Due to changing quarantine measures, the activities, destination/s, store/s, establishment/s featured in this article might be temporarily prohibited or closed under the latest government policies. LGUs might also implement health protocols and travel requirements. Please get in touch with the establishment/s before visiting. Stay safe!


local delicacies Bacolod City

Bacolod City is a foodie haven in the province of Negros Occidental. Various delectable dishes are found in homegrown restaurants where locals and visitors can taste and experience authentic Bacolod food and hospitality. Do you know any native delicacies from Bacolod? Have you ever wondered what they taste like? If you do, here’s good news for you: it’s easy to find these delicacies since they’re all over Bacolod City’s public markets! Read on and check out this list of native delicacies you can find in Bacolod City.




1. Kadios, Baboy and Langka (KBL)



local delicacies Bacolod City

Some KBL contains monggo seeds instead of kadios in some local restaurants in the public market.


Kadios, Baboy and Langka or KBL is a popular Ilonggo stew that commonly uses dark purple kadios (pigeon peas) to make it tastier. It’s also a good source of protein. Another ingredient for the recipe is baboy (pork) where any part of the pork can be served depending on your choice. Unripe langka (jackfruit) and a sour fruit locally known as batuan (garcinia morella) are used to make KBL extra special. Small and local restaurants serve the dish usually during lunchtime, so when noon comes, all you need to say are three letters: K-B-L.


2. Chicken Inasal



local delicacies Bacolod City

Bacolod’s most sought-after chicken inasal with a one-of-a-kind chicken oil.


Wondering where to eat chicken inasal in Bacolod City? Manokan Country* is the most popular answer to that question, and it is just a five-minute drive from Bacolod City Central Public Market. It is home to dozens of stalls serving Bacolod’s most sought-after chicken inasal. The most recommended stalls are usually named after women like Aida’s, Nena’s Rose, Nena’s Beth, and Carmen. Of course, the experience will not be complete without eating with your bare hands, and dipping your inasal in tasty sinamak (Visayan spiced vinegar).



3. Ensalada



local delicacies Bacolod City

Appetizing ensalada that will make your inner vegan crave.


Ensalada is one of the delicious appetizers or side dishes to try here in the City of Smiles. One should have a taste of this dish when visiting the city. Ensalada is suitable for vegans as it is made of blanched and chopped banana heart, shallots, tomatoes, and chilies mixed together with calamansi (calamondin) juice and coconut milk. This appetizing and colorful dish is typically served in local restaurants and eateries found in the city’s public markets.


4. Kalamayhati



local delicacies Bacolod City

One can taste this sticky delight in a coconut shell, just like the way locals eat it.


Kalamayhati is a sweet delight made from ground sticky rice, muscovado sugar, and coconut milk, and sometimes, sesame seeds. Kalamayhati is a native delicacy that is brown in color. The name of the delicacy comes from the words kalamay (sugar) and hati (to halve), because of the coconut shell that needs to be split in half before consuming this sweet treat. Kalamayhati is also sold in plastic containers at the local markets. Prices range from PhP10 to PhP30.



5. Baye-baye



local delicacies Bacolod City

Variations of baye-baye in the public market. Brown baye-baye is mixed with muscovado sugar while white ones are mixed with regular washed white sugar.


Baye-baye is a mixture of sugar and toasted milled glutinous rice or corn that is pounded in a mortar until soft and incorporated. Strips of young coconut are also added to make it extra special. Making it is strenuous, and this is why tasting it is a one of a kind experience as well. Usually served as a snack, baye-baye is also cooked during special occasions, especially during the Tigkalalag (Day of the Dead) and Holy Week, to signify that our love for the Lord and late loved ones would stick just like the baye-baye.


6. Cansi



local delicacies Bacolod City

A piping hot bowl of Cansi on a lazy afternoon.


One thing you shouldn’t miss whenever you are in a public market is eating in a cansihan. Tourists visiting the city must not miss to try cansi, Bacolod’s version of bulalo (beef shank soup). Cansi is a hot bowl of bone marrow soup with a special ingredient called batuan that gives it a unique sour flavor. Some recommended homegrown restaurants are Sharyn’s Cansi House and Eron’s Cansi House, both located near the Capitol Shopping Center and the Bacolod City North Public Market.



Make sure to visit Yoorekka to learn and find out more about the best native delicacies in Bacolod.


Among the native delicacies featured, what dish would you definitely try on your next visit in Bacolod City? Let us know in the comment section below!


* Prices may change without prior notice.


This article was originally published in Yoorekka on May 24, 2018.


Check out this video:




Due to changing quarantine measures, the activities, destination/s, store/s, establishment/s featured in this article might be temporarily prohibited or closed under the latest government policies. LGUs might also implement health protocols and travel requirements. Please get in touch with the establishment/s before visiting. Stay safe!


local delicacies Bacolod City

Bacolod City is a foodie haven in the province of Negros Occidental. Various delectable dishes are found in homegrown restaurants where locals and visitors can taste and experience authentic Bacolod food and hospitality. Do you know any native delicacies from Bacolod? Have you ever wondered what they taste like? If you do, here’s good news for you: it’s easy to find these delicacies since they’re all over Bacolod City’s public markets! Read on and check out this list of native delicacies you can find in Bacolod City.




1. Kadios, Baboy and Langka (KBL)



local delicacies Bacolod City

Some KBL contains monggo seeds instead of kadios in some local restaurants in the public market.


Kadios, Baboy and Langka or KBL is a popular Ilonggo stew that commonly uses dark purple kadios (pigeon peas) to make it tastier. It’s also a good source of protein. Another ingredient for the recipe is baboy (pork) where any part of the pork can be served depending on your choice. Unripe langka (jackfruit) and a sour fruit locally known as batuan (garcinia morella) are used to make KBL extra special. Small and local restaurants serve the dish usually during lunchtime, so when noon comes, all you need to say are three letters: K-B-L.


2. Chicken Inasal



local delicacies Bacolod City

Bacolod’s most sought-after chicken inasal with a one-of-a-kind chicken oil.


Wondering where to eat chicken inasal in Bacolod City? Manokan Country* is the most popular answer to that question, and it is just a five-minute drive from Bacolod City Central Public Market. It is home to dozens of stalls serving Bacolod’s most sought-after chicken inasal. The most recommended stalls are usually named after women like Aida’s, Nena’s Rose, Nena’s Beth, and Carmen. Of course, the experience will not be complete without eating with your bare hands, and dipping your inasal in tasty sinamak (Visayan spiced vinegar).



3. Ensalada



local delicacies Bacolod City

Appetizing ensalada that will make your inner vegan crave.


Ensalada is one of the delicious appetizers or side dishes to try here in the City of Smiles. One should have a taste of this dish when visiting the city. Ensalada is suitable for vegans as it is made of blanched and chopped banana heart, shallots, tomatoes, and chilies mixed together with calamansi (calamondin) juice and coconut milk. This appetizing and colorful dish is typically served in local restaurants and eateries found in the city’s public markets.


4. Kalamayhati



local delicacies Bacolod City

One can taste this sticky delight in a coconut shell, just like the way locals eat it.


Kalamayhati is a sweet delight made from ground sticky rice, muscovado sugar, and coconut milk, and sometimes, sesame seeds. Kalamayhati is a native delicacy that is brown in color. The name of the delicacy comes from the words kalamay (sugar) and hati (to halve), because of the coconut shell that needs to be split in half before consuming this sweet treat. Kalamayhati is also sold in plastic containers at the local markets. Prices range from PhP10 to PhP30.



5. Baye-baye



local delicacies Bacolod City

Variations of baye-baye in the public market. Brown baye-baye is mixed with muscovado sugar while white ones are mixed with regular washed white sugar.


Baye-baye is a mixture of sugar and toasted milled glutinous rice or corn that is pounded in a mortar until soft and incorporated. Strips of young coconut are also added to make it extra special. Making it is strenuous, and this is why tasting it is a one of a kind experience as well. Usually served as a snack, baye-baye is also cooked during special occasions, especially during the Tigkalalag (Day of the Dead) and Holy Week, to signify that our love for the Lord and late loved ones would stick just like the baye-baye.


6. Cansi



local delicacies Bacolod City

A piping hot bowl of Cansi on a lazy afternoon.


One thing you shouldn’t miss whenever you are in a public market is eating in a cansihan. Tourists visiting the city must not miss to try cansi, Bacolod’s version of bulalo (beef shank soup). Cansi is a hot bowl of bone marrow soup with a special ingredient called batuan that gives it a unique sour flavor. Some recommended homegrown restaurants are Sharyn’s Cansi House and Eron’s Cansi House, both located near the Capitol Shopping Center and the Bacolod City North Public Market.



Make sure to visit Yoorekka to learn and find out more about the best native delicacies in Bacolod.


Among the native delicacies featured, what dish would you definitely try on your next visit in Bacolod City? Let us know in the comment section below!


* Prices may change without prior notice.


This article was originally published in Yoorekka on May 24, 2018.


Check out this video:





author

Yoorekka’s team is composed of talented writers from all over the Philippines with varied interests, from creative writing to environmental advocacy. There is one thing that they share, though: they’re all passionate about producing articles that are not only interesting to read but also useful for anyone reading!

pasalubong market native food food Bacolod City

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